Schlagwort-Archive: #Germany

EU may fall apart due to failed neo-liberal policies – Noam Chomsky to RT, 30.11.2016

globalcrisis/globalchange NEWS
Martin Zeis, 01.12.2016

Dear all,

based on a comparative monetary study almost 200 non-mainstream economists published an Open Letter year-end 1998 warning/demonstrating that a single currency established in the EU without a electorate-approved (per national refererendum held in every member-state) common political structure enabling mechanisms of financial compensation is foredoomed to fail.

In Germany these voices were mainly ignored resp. ridiculed – particularly by the Keynesians. At that time simliar doubts/warnings were expressed in Suisse/GB/US by independent investment-guys like Egon von Greyerz, libertarians like Ron Paul or ruthless gamblers like Soros …

Almost too late Noam Chomsky outlines the economic and political results of this EU-direction …

Greets,
Martin Zeis

RT, 30.11.2016 — https://www.rt.com/news/368761-chomsky-eu-collapse-trump

‚Tragic development’: EU may fall apart due to failed neo-liberal policies – Noam Chomsky to RT

The surge in right-wing and anti-establishment sentiments as a result of failed neo-liberal policies in Europe is likely to lead to collapse of the EU in “a tragic development,” prominent American linguist, scholar and activist Noam Chomsky told RT.

France’s right-wing presidential candidate Marine Le Pen, who is rooting for a referendum regarding France’s membership in the EU, stands a good chance of winning the elections and thus likely initiating the so-called Frexit, Chomsky said in an interview with RT on Wednesday. (see: YouTube-Video, 3:42 min — URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLCLhbDiWLw )

“I don’t think Germany would initiate it [the collapse of the EU] because they are beneficiaries of the union,” Chomsky said.

“If the union falls apart, I think it would be a tragic development,” he added.

Chomsky said that failed “neo-liberal policies of the past generation” influenced such a significant rise in popularity of the right-wing parties.

“These programs were designed in such a way so that they would lead to stagnation and even decline for a large part, actually, majority of the population. They also severely undermined democracy, which is even more true in Europe than in the US,” he said.

“The result of these processes is that people are angry, disillusioned, their hopes for the future have collapsed,” Chomsky said.

While lauding the European integration as one of the “great achievements of the post-WWII period,” Chomsky said it has become practically dysfunctional.

“The establishment of a single currency without the proper political structure is a recipe for disaster,” he said.

There are “no mechanisms for the rich sectors to assist the poor sectors in times of difficulty” in the EU, Chomsky continued, speaking of the underlying reasons for such a development.

There’s a “rigid structure” in the European countries such as Greece or Italy that do not have “control over their currencies” and there is “no compensatory system that exists in the federal structure like in the United States,” Chomsky said.

“In Europe, whoever is elected, no matter where they are in the political spectrum, the policies are going to be the same, because they are not determined by the policies in their countries,” Chomsky said, citing the Wall Street Journal, adding that the polices all go back to “unelected bureaucracies” and there’s no way for a EU country to act in its own interest.

According to Chomsky, the agenda of such groups as Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis’s DiEM25 (Democracy in Europe Movement 2025), which seeks to preserve the EU by overcoming problems within it, is a “more constructive approach.”

He also discussed the agenda of US President-elect Donald Trump, who has been dubbed an “anti-establishment” candidate – the idea Chomsky doesn’t agree with.

“Take a look at Trump and who he has appointed for the cabinet. Secretary of Treasury, most important position, determines what happens in the economy, is he anti-establishment? He comes from Goldman Sachs,” Chomsky pointed out.

Stock values in financial institutions that “escalated to the sky” when Trump was elected also “show how anti-establishment he is,” Chomsky said.

How the Greeks were robbing the Germans

 German minister of finance Dr. Schäuble’s revengeful measures against the Greece people and economy backed by main economists in Germany:

 

The Opinion Pages | Op-Ed Contributor 
Germany’s Destructive Anger

By JACOB SOLL 
A DEAL has finally been reached that could keep Greece in the eurozone. Few are happy with the outcome. We’ve heard a lot about how the Greeks feel humiliated. But we’ve heard less about German anger, and we know they are angry. Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble was reported to have started yelling during Saturday night’s negotiations. France and Italy have both made huge loans to Greece, but neither country has expressed hostility to Greece. Why is Germany so angry?

As an economic historian, I got a taste of this resentment during a conference on Greek sovereign debt held in Munich last week. It took place at the Center for Economic Studies and the Ifo Institute, which are headed by Hans-Werner Sinn, the German economist and longtime proponent of a Grexit. The conference included economists, accountants, journalists, investors and government officials from both Greece and Germany. Diverging views were aired by Mitu Gulati, the Duke law professor who helped devise an earlier Greek bailout; by Ashoka Mody, an economist, formerly of the International Monetary Fund, who preaches debt forgiveness; by accounting experts, who agreed that Greece’s total debts seem to have been inflated; and by Mr. Sinn.

But when the German economists spoke at the final session, a completely different tone took over the room. Within the economic theories and numbers came a moral message: The Germans were honest dupes and the Greeks corrupt, unreliable and incompetent. Both parties were reduced to caricatures of themselves. We’ve heard this story throughout the negotiations, but in that room, it was clear how much resentment shapes the views of German economists.
Clemens Fuest, of the Center for European Economic Research, who has advised Mr. Schäuble, kept reciting numbers about Greek debt and growth, and said the Greeks had failed at every level over the past several years to manage their debt. He believed they should simply be thrown out of the eurozone. Henrik Enderlein, of the pro-European Jacques Delors Institute, said that Greece should stay in the eurozone, but only if it applied more austerity and better management. Daniel Gros, director of the Center for European Policy Studies, theorized that Greek debt and economic woes could be countered only with better export numbers.
All points were important, but to hear it from these economists, Germany played no real part in the Greek tragedy. They handed over their money and watched as the Greeks destroyed themselves over the past four years. Now the Greeks deserved what was coming to them.

When I pointed out that the Germans had played a major role in this situation, helping at the very least by insisting on austerity and unsustainable debt over the last three years, doing little to improve accounting standards, and now effectively imposing devastating capital controls, Mr. Enderlein and Mr. Fuest scoffed. When I mentioned that many saw austerity as a new version of the 1919 Versailles Treaty that would bring in a future “chaotic and unreliable” government in Greece — the very kind that Mr. Enderlein warned about in an essay in The Guardian — they countered that they were furious about being compared to Nazis and terrorists.
When I noted that no matter how badly the Greeks had handled their economy, German demands and the possible chaos of a Grexit risked political populism, unrest and social misery, they were unmoved. Debtors who default, they explained, would simply have to suffer, no matter how rough and even unfair the terms of the loans. There were those who handled their economies well, and took their suffering silently, like Finland and Latvia, they said. In contrast, a country like Greece, where many people don’t pay their taxes, did not seem to merit empathy. It reminded me that in German, debt, “schuld,” also means moral fault or blame.

When I asked if any had visited Greece to assess poverty, brain drain and business closings, they simply shook their heads. When I asked what responsibility these leading economists felt in the Greek crisis, they told me that I could not understand the situation by simply flying in from the United States. (For the record, I have spent much of the year in Europe, meeting with the previous Greek government in Athens — where I saw hungry old people rummaging in trash cans — and later with members of the European Commission in Brussels.)

When the panel split up, German attendees circled me to explain how the Greeks were robbing the Germans. They did not want to be victims anymore. While I certainly accepted their economic points and, indeed, the point that European Union member countries owe Germany so much money that more defaults could sink Germany, it was hard, in Munich at least, to see the Germans as true victims.
Here lies a major cultural disconnect, and also a risk for the Germans. For it seems that their sense of victimization has made them lose their cool, both in negotiations and in their economic assessments. If the Germans are going to lead Europe, they can’t do it as victims.
Jacob Soll, a professor of history and accounting at the University of Southern California, is the author of “The Reckoning: Financial Accountability and the Rise and Fall of Nations.”
 

Yours sincerely
Elke Schenk
globalcrisis/globalchange NEWS
 

A gloss by Pepe ESCOBAR: SPIEF — St. Petersburg in the heart of the action; June 20, 2015

http://atimes.com/2015/06/spief-st-petersburg-in-the-heart-of-the-action-escobar/

SPIEF — St. Petersburg in the heart of the action
BY PEPE ESCOBAR on JUNE 20, 2015

The dogs of western fear and sanctions bark, while the Eurasian caravan passes.

And no caravanserai could possibly compete with the 19th edition of the St. Peters-burg International Economic Forum (SPIEF). Thousands of global business leaders – including Europeans, but not Americans; after all, President Putin is “the new Hitler” – representing over 1,000 international companies/corporations, including the CEOs of BP, Royal Dutch Shell and Total, hit town in style.
Fascinating panels all around – including discussions on the BRICs; the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO); the New Silk Road(s); the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU); and of course the theme of all themes, “The Making of the Asia-Pacific Century: Rebalancing East,” with former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd.
Predictably, there’s been plenty of anticipation regarding the BRICs New Development Bank, with big news coming next month at the BRICs summit in Ufa. Brazilian Paulo Nogueira Batista, the new vice-president of the bank, looks forward to the first meeting of the governors.
And on another key theme — bypassing the US dollar — it was up to Anatoliy Aksa-kov, chairman of the Duma Committee on Economic Policy, Innovative Development and Entrepreneurship, to cut to the chase; “We need to transition to conducting mutual settlements in national currencies, and we believe that all the conditions are already in place for this.”
The action was not only rhetorical. Here’s just a fraction of the deals clinched at SPIEF. Predictably, it’s been a Pipelineistan show all around.

– The pipes for the Turkish Stream pipeline under the Black Sea will start to be laid down this month, or at latest by July, according to Russian Energy Minister Alexan-der Novak.
– Gazprom’s CEO Aleksey Miller and Greek Energy Minister Panagiotis Lafazanis practically clinched the extension of Turkish Stream to Greece. They are “preparing an appropriate intergovernmental memorandum,” according to Gazprom.
– Gazprom also announced it will build a new double pipeline from Russia to Germany, across the Baltic Sea, in partnership with Germany’s E.ON, Anglo-Dutch Shell and Austria’s OMV.

In another crucial Eurasian front, India signed a framework agreement to create a free trade zone with the Eurasian Economic Union. Indian Minister of Commerce Nirmala Sitharaman was euphoric: “The two regions are big, anything done together should naturally lead to bigger outcomes.” (…)

— full text attached —

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Martin Zeis
globalcrisis/globalchange NEWS
martin.zeis

ESCOBAR-SPIEF150620.pdf

Germany to Decide Where the EU Goes next on Russia, Greece

http://russia-insider.com/en/opinion/2015/02/16/3547

— Full text attached (pdf-file) —

Germany to Decide Where the EU Goes next on Russia, Greece By Pepe ESCOBAR
The Moscow-Berlin deal in Minsk shows the way forward for Germany and the EU –
gain greater public appeal and legitimacy by moving to independence from the Empire of Chaos
By Pepe ESCOBAR,
RI, Feb 19, 2015, 10:00 MEZ

Germany holds the key to where Europe goes next. A fragile deal may have been reached on Ukraine, but there’s still no deal with Greece. In both cases, there’s much more than meets the eye. (…)

And cutting through all the spin, what remains, essentially, is what European Com-mission President Jean-Claude Juncker told Le Figaro a few days ago; it’s out of the question to suppress the Greek debt and, most of all, “there can be no democratic option against European treaties.” There it is, crystal clear: EU institutions work against democracy.

Plan B remains a distinct possibility. Moscow has already invited Tsipras to meet with Putin. And Beijing has invited Tsipras to meet with Prime Minister Li Keqiang. These are the “R” and the “C” in BRICS in action.

It’s worth remembering Greek Defense Minister Panos Kammenos when he articulated if not a majority view, at least a substantial perception among Greek public opinion; “We want a deal. But if there is no deal, and if we see that Germany remains rigid and wants to blow Europe apart, then we will have to go to Plan B… We have other ways of finding money. It could be the United States at best, it could be Russia, it could be China or other countries.”

Alea jacta est. Troika or RC? (…)

Slowly but surely, public opinion across Europe – and especially Germany – is experiencing a tectonic shift. The obsession by the ‘Empire of Chaos’ to further weaponize Kiev has horrified millions – resurrecting the specter of a war in Europe’s eastern borderlands. Not only in Germany but also in France, Italy, Spain, there is a growing continental consensus against NATO.

Even at the height of a vicious Russia demonization campaign unleashed by virtually the whole German corporate media, a Deutschland Trend survey revealed that most Germans are against NATO troops in Eastern Europe. And no less than 49 percent would rather see Germany position itself as a bridge between East and West. The leadership in Beijing definitely took note.

So it’s tempting to hop on the Merkel/Hollande peace train as the heart of Europe finally exercising their sovereignty and frontally defying the ‘Empire of Chaos’. Perhaps that could be the embryo of a German-French partnership for peace in Europe and even beyond, from the Middle East to Africa.

That would frontally antagonize NATO’s screenplay – which implies the ’Empire of Chaos’ ruling uncontested over Europe, the Middle East and even across Eurasia, with continental European powers, especially Germany, France and yes, Russia, at the margins.

Sooner or later European politicians will have to wake up and smell the coffee; the notion of a German-French-Russian pan-European peace/trade partnership is way more popular than reflected in failed corporate media. (…)

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Martin Zeis
globalcrisis/globalchange NEWS
martin.zeis@gmxpro.net

Europe Fractures: France Pivots To Putin, Germany-US Splinter On Ukraine

by Tyler Durden Zero Hedge 10.02.2015
Following yesterday’s summary of the utter farce that the Minsk Summit/Ukraine “peace” deal talks have become, the various parties involved appear to be fracturing even faster today. The headlines are coming thick and fast but most prescient appears to be: Despite John Kerry’s denial of any split between Germany and US over arms deliveries to Ukraine, German Foreign Minister Steinmeier slammed Washington’s strategy for being “not just risky but counterproductive.” But perhaps most significantly is France’s continued apparent pivot towards Russia…
http://www.globalresearch.ca/europe-fractures-france-pivots-to-putin-germany-us-splinter-on-ukraine/5430300